Gallery Projects

Adler Guerrier
Aramis Gutierrez
Quisqueya Henriquez
Susan Lee-Chun
Pepe Mar
Glexis Novoa
Leyden Rodriguez-Casanova
Frances Trombly
Wendy Wischer

July 10, 2010 - August 31, 2010

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David Castillo Gallery opens its summer exhibition with works by gallery artists Adler Guerrier, Aramis Gutierrez, Quisqueya Henriquez, Susan Lee-Chun, Pepe Mar, Glexis Novoa, Leyden Rodriguez-Casanova, Frances Trombly, and Wendy Wischer.

 

Adler Guerrier sets drawing, collage, photography, video, sculpture, and installation in dialogue. His jazz-inspired play between color and plane are anchored by fearless, site-specific subversions of place and time in regards to conceptions of race, class, and culture. Aramis Gutierrez’s oil paintings explore personal and historic conflict on an epic scale. His storytelling culls from a variety of sources ranging from pop culture icons to Evolutionary Psychology. Quisqueya Henriquez explores racial, ethnic, and gender stereotypes through sculpture, collage, prints, video, installations, and sound. Her work often fuses the formalities of economics, current events, and Art History with vernacular life in the Caribbean.

 

Susan Lee-Chun examines the polarizing impacts of race and identity politics by creating egos of assimilation, independence, and mediation. Pepe Mar fuses color and form with techno music obsessions and consumer culture to create fetishistic, tribal-mechanical beings in sculpture and collage. In his latest work Mar continues to derive inspiration from the extravagant by utilizing a vareity of materials including found objects and gold leaf. For the first time in twenty-five years, Glexis Novoa has made works on paper; these drawings, like the artist’s marble works, show Novoa’s commentary on society and culture from a miniature perspective.

 

Leyden Rodriguez-Casanova challenges the absoluteness of psychological and utilitarian narratives associated with our utilization and memory of everyday objects. Frances Trombly retells the narratives of domesticity in a voice laced with feminist awareness. She employs traditionally effeminate techniques in craft and craftmanship to employ a new scrutiny upon daily life. Wendy Wischer has camped at the intersection of solaced nature and societal technology, creating introspective works in sound, light, and sculpture concerned with how a single set of principles can be found throughout the universe.